Nutrition and Wellness Programs

to combat childhood obesity

Louise Earle Loomis Children's Wellness Center

A Vision for Hartford's Children
In 2012, Family Life Education began to work with Dr. Louise Earle Loomis, a prominent Hartford educator and founder of the ThinkWell Center. Together they cast a vision for a center that would address the physical, cognitive, emotional, and relational aspects of child development.
Their vision became a reality. Family Life embarked on a multi-year capital campaign and partnership with The Corporation for Independent Living (CIL) to convert a former horse nail factory into a facility designed with children in mind.
The Louise E. Loomis Children's Wellness Center
The 5,400-SF center, centrally  located close to downtown Hartford, opened in 2018 through generous community support. 
The facility is custom-designed to accommodate age-appropriate, developmental activities for young children, two-generation physical fitness activities, cooking classes, nutrition education, community gardening, and more. 
The modern building houses the Family Center, administrative and program offices.  With open ceilings and exposed rafters throughout, the heart of the building features a 1,700-SF central room equipped with a full-service demonstration kitchen area and tables for cooking classes and in-person meetings. 
The facility also offers classroom space, child care and play areas, and a large conference area.
The 5,400-SF center, centrally located close to downtown Hartford, opened in 2018 through generous community support. 
 The facility is custom-designed to accommodate age-appropriate, developmental activities for young children, two-generation physical fitness activities, cooking classes, nutrition education, community gardening, and more. 
The modern building houses the Family Center, administrative and program offices. With open ceilings and exposed rafters throughout, the heart of the building features a 1,700 square foot central room equipped with a full-service demonstration kitchen area and tables for cooking classes and in-person meetings. 
The facility also offers classroom space, child care and play areas, and a large conference area.
Community Food Pantry
In Hartford, one of the poorest cities in the U.S., the combination of hunger, food insecurity, and lack of access to healthy food can be a daily challenge for many families.
FLE’s onsite Community Food Pantry, located near downtown Hartford, offers food assistance to underserved communities and reduces the burden on food budgets stretched in an era of rapidly rising prices.
Print our brochure to learn more!
In Hartford, one of the poorest cities in the U.S., the combination of hunger, food insecurity, and lack of access to healthy food is a daily challenge for many families.
The onsite Community Food Pantry, located near downtown Hartford, reaches out to underserved communities to reduce the burden on food budgets stretched in an era of rapidly rising prices.
Print our brochure to learn more!
For more information, contact
Jennifer Gawitt-Pratt 
or call 860-231-7744 
Nutrition and Healthy Cooking
One aspect of food insecurity is a lack of knowledge of nutrition and its impact on health.
As part of the Nutrition Matters program, qualified parents enroll in a 10-week, instructor led series of classes that with interactive cooking demonstrations, budgeting skills, shopping and preparing nutritious meals, and other related topics, culminating in a collective action project.
The classes are offered in both English and Spanish to accommodate the language needs and cultural dimensions of food and nutrition information.
Food insecurity is the result of limited resources coupled with a lack of knowledge of nutrition and its impact on health.
As part of the Nutrition Matters program, qualified parents can enroll in a 10-week, instructor led series of classes that includes interactive cooking demonstrations, budgeting skills, shopping and preparing nutritious meals, and other related topics.
The classes are offered in both English and Spanish to accommodate the language needs and cultural dimensions of food and nutrition information.
For more information, contact
Jennifer Gawitt-Pratt
or call 860-231-7744 
In Partnership With